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January 8th

I was reading this article on Ed Reed when I noticed shifts in color in the text. To make sure I wasn’t going bonkers, I looked at the source code.

Sure enough, the code looked like this:


<p></p>
But enshrinement in Canton might be the last thing on Reed's mind,
if he even thinks about it at all.
<p></p>
</p><p>
Away from the field, Reed is thoughtful and intelligent --
he graduated from the University of Miami with a liberal arts degree
 in three years -- but he also is a very private person. He's what those
in the NFL community call a "football player." It describes one who enjoys
winning and the competition of the game but not necessarily the
publicity that comes with it.
<p></p>
Reed is a throwback to a time when game day was the
only day that mattered in the NFL.
He is not a fan of the incessant sideshow, hype and
smack talk that goes on in between games today.
Reed's approach would make many old-timers proud.
<p></p>
On Saturday in Nashville, Tenn., Reed will be an important player to watch
when the sixth-seeded Ravens (12-5) play the top-seeded Titans
(13-3) for the right to advance to the AFC Championship Game.
Until then, ESPN.com will help you get a better understanding
of the five-time Pro Bowler and this season's interception leader.
<p></p> 

Upon further examination this is happening in alot of other articles, so it isn’t some lazy web producer. I understand ESPN is transitioning a new design (which looks nicer but a pain to navigate BTW). I am guessing its some bad template code in their CMS (a massive site like ESPN is likely to have a custom CMS solution). I hope ESPN.com finds this problem so that nerds like me do not go crazy.

About the article, wouldn’t Nick Markakis, Adam Jones, and Ed Reed make one of the best outfields in the Majors?

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